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151 Tenminste nog één levende persoon is verbonden aan deze aantekening - detailgegevens worden niet weergegeven. Thunnissen, P.B. (I371)
 
152 27 May Bos, Neeltje (I18348)
 
153 2707 Byron Center Ave SW
City: Grand Rapids
County: Kent
State: Michigan
Zip Code: 49509
Phone Number: 616
Record Number: 605105055
Age: 71 
Komejan, Howard Jr. (I43032)
 
154 29-05-1952 ge-emigreerd naar Canada, daar hebben ze bij hun 50 jarig huwelijk in 1982 een interview gegeven met het feit dat ze 8 zonen hebben, 1 dochter allemaal getrouwd, 38 kleinkinderen en 2 achterkleinkinderen! Weening, Freerk (Fred) (I51746)
 
155 3 kinderen uit 1e huwelijkmisschien 30-10-1940 OPS(185) Noppert, Roelofje (I1164)
 
156 30 mei 1756 tot 29 mei 1758 was Klaas door de kerkenraad benoemt tot diaken (=armenzorg) van de gecombineerde gemeenten Drogeham en Harkema Opeinde. Claas (Klaas) Folkerts (I46620)
 
157 30 sep 1943 PB12479 Spinder, Johannes (I46958)
 
158 40-45 Persoonsbewijs: PB20360 de Ruiter, Everardus (Ab) (I14)
 
159 Tenminste nog één levende persoon is verbonden aan deze aantekening - detailgegevens worden niet weergegeven. Gezin F20366
 
160 6-10-1908 ipv op haar grafsteen vermelde 6-11-1907 Tabak, Geertje (I47486)
 
161 7 augustus 1751 aangenomen als lidmaat van de gecombineerde gemeenten Drogeham en Harkema Opeinde. Claas (Klaas) Folkerts (I46620)
 
162 7 maand na oudere broer? Daling, Hermannus (I44180)
 
163 Tenminste nog één levende persoon is verbonden aan deze aantekening - detailgegevens worden niet weergegeven. van Breeden, G. (I56853)
 
164 a daughter of the bishop of Viborg in Jutland Gezin F8169
 
165 A History of the English Speaking People Winston S Churchill Vol I The Birth of Britain Dodd Mead & Co 1956 p128: "Edward's sister had been, as we have seen, married to Earl Ethelred of Mercia. Ethelred died in 911, and his widow, Ethelfleda, succeeded and supassed him. In those savage times the mergence of a woman ruler was enough to betoken her possession of extraordinary qualities. Edward the Elder, as he was afterwards called, and his sister, the Lady of the Mercians,' conducted the national war in common, and carried its success to heights which Alred never knew. The policy of the two kingdoms, thus knit by blood and need, marched in perfect harmony, and the next onslaught of Danes was met with confident alacrity and soon broken. The victors then set themselves deliberately to the complete conquest of the Danelaw and its Five Boroughs. This task occupied the next ten years, brother and sister advancing in concert upon their respective lines, and fortifying towns they took at every stage. In 918, when Edward stormed Tempsford, near Bedford, and King Guthrum was killed, the whole resistance of East Anglia collapsed, and all the Danish leaders submitted to Edward as their protector and lord. They were granted in return their estates and the right to live according to their Danish customs. At the same time the Lady of the Mercians' conquered Leicester, and received even from York offers ofsubmission. In this hour of success Ethelfleda died, and Edward, hastening to Tamworth, was invited by the nobles of Mercia to occupy the vacant throne."

Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1981, Micropaedia, Vol III, p799, Edward the Elder: "[Edward's]sister, the Mercian ruler Aethelflaed, constructed a complementary series of fortresses in the northwest Midlands. In 917 Edward and Aethelflaed launched a massive offensive, quickly overwhelming the entire Danish army of East Anglia. Upon Aethelflaed's death in June 918, Edward assumed control of Mercia..."

Vol I, p116, Aethelflaed: "also Ethelfleda, called Lady of the Mercians, Died 12 Jun 918 Tamworth (now in Staffordshire), Anglo-Saxon ruler of Mercia in England. The daughter of Alfred the Great,...Aethelflaed became the effective ruler of Mercia some years before the death (911) of her husband, Aethelred, Ealdorman of the Mercians...captured Derby occupied Leicester but died before the campaign was successfully completed. Edward then claimed his sister's kingdom and completed the subjugation of the Danes. Because Aethelflaed had extended her influence into Wales and Northumbria, Edward was able to assert his authority over these regions as well. Thus, almost all of England came under his control."

The New Columbia Encyclopedia, 1975, p175, Athelstan: "...As a youth he lived in the household of his aunt, Aethelflaed, Lady of the Mercians..."

From Alfred to Henry III 871-1272, Christopher Brooke, 1961, Norton Library History of England, p43: "...In 886 [Alfred] captured London, and put it in charge of his close ally, Ethelred, Ealdorman of the Mercians, who shortly after married Alfred's daughter, Aethelflaed..."

p50: "...Ethelred,Ealdorman of Mercia, died in 911, but co-operation did not cease with his death. His place was filled by his wife, Edward's sister, Aethelflaed, Lady of the Mercians', who continued her husband's work in close association with her brother until her own death in 918; from then on Wessex and Mercia were united..."

"...After the Ealdorman Ethelred's death in 911, Edward took over London and the south-east Midlands, leaving the rest of English Mercia to Aethelflaed. The building offortresses and the advance east and north went on steadily through the following years. In 914 Aethelflaed built a fortress at Eddisbury (Cheshire) and at Warwick; in 917 she captured Derby; in 918 Leicester, and but for her death that year she might have received the submission of York. In 912 Edward built a burh at Herford, and prepared for campaigns to east and north. In 914 and 915 he received the submission of Bedford and Northampton; in 916 he built a burh at Maldon in Essex;in 917 he and his followers defeated a great counteroffensive mounted by the Danes, and occupied Essex and East Anglia, restoring the burh at Colchester. In 918 he was at Stamford and Nottingham. These places had been two of the crucial Danishcentres of power south of the Humber; it is likely that a third, Lincoln, also submitted to Edward in thsi year. By these surrenders he became lord of the Danelaw up to the line of the Humber; by his sister's death he was lord of Mercia; and inthe same year the kings of several leading Welsh kingdoms accepted his overlordship.

"The offer by the Danes of York to submit to Aethelflaed- an offer not repeated to Edward after her death- was partly inspired by the progress of anotherViking power, this time of Norse origin and leadership..."

The Formation of England 550-1042, HPR Finberg, 1977, Paladin, p127: "...In 885 the Danes in East Anglia broke the peace. Alfred reacted strongly, and in the following year took London by storm. London had long been a Mercian town, and Alfred refrained from annexing it to his own kingdom. Ceolwulf II, the last English king of Mercia, being now presumably dead, the part of Mercia not under Danish rule was governed by an ealdorman named Ethelred. Alfred entrusted the government of London to him and gave him his daughter Aethelflaed in marriage. Thus far Mercian independence was respected, but Ethelred never assumed the kingly title, and was content to reign as Alfred's viceroy...

p145: "The possibility that [the Norwegian immigrants crossing from Ireland and settling in the north-west] might make common cause with the independent Danish forces in eastern England naturally alarmed the government of English Mercia. The ealsorman Ethelred, as loyal to King Edward as he had been to Edward's father, was now a sick man, and responsibility devolved upon his wife, Alfred's daughter Aethelflaed. In 907 she repaired the walls of Chester and placed a garrison there to control disaffection in Wirral..."

"In 911 Ethelred of Mercia died, and Aethelflaed acquiesced when Edward annexed London and Oxford to his own kingdom. The doughty princess, half Mercian by descent on her mother's side, was known as the Lady of the Mercians. For the rest of her life she collaborated loyally and effectively with her brother in a campaign to subdue the independent Danish armies in England.

"The key to their strategy was the extension of the system devised by Alfred, of building fortresses, boroughs', to protect English territory from Danish inroads and to serve as bases for operations against the enemy... Meanwhile Aethelflaed fortified Sceargeat, a place as yet unidentified, and Bridgenorth on the Severn, a favourite crossing place of Danish war-bands. In 913 she built fortresses at Tamworth to protect the Mercian border from attack by the Danes of Leicester, and at Stafford to bar entry into the valley of the Trent. Next year she repaired a prehistoric camp at Eddisbury from which a garrison could intercept raiders landing from the Mersey. She also fortified Warwick...In 915 Aethelflaed secured her frontier with mid-Wales by a fort at Chirbury and guarded the head of the Mersey with one at Runcorn. By 916 a line of fortresses from Essex to the Mersey, eleven of them built or repaired by Aethelflaed, sixteen by Edward, menaced the Danes, who hurled themselves against them in vain. The last known Danish king of East Anglia perished in battle. Within a year the army of Northampton surrendered, Huntingdon was occupied, the armies of Cambridge and East Anglia submitted to Edward, and Derby, the first of the five principal Danish boroughs, was taken by Aethelflaed. There remained Leicester, Nottingham, Stamford, and Lincoln. In 918 Edward advanced to Stamford and overawed the Danes there into submission, while Aethelflaed made her entry unopposed into Leicester. Before the end of the year Nottingham had surrendered and all England south of the Humber acknowledged Edward as its master.

"Throughout this masterly campaign, brilliantly conceived and prosecuted with unwavering determination, the Lady of the Mercians acted in perfect accord with her brother. Both of them displayed generalship of the highest order. By contrast, the lack of cohesion between the various Danish armies weakened their resistance to the victorious pair. But Aethelflaed did not live to see the final triumph. She died on 12 June 918, leaving one child, a daughter Aelfwynn. To forestall any separatist tendency, Edward promptly occupied Tamworth, received the submission of the Mercians, and took command of their levies. Then he completed Aethelflaed's defences of her northern frontier by building a new fortress at Thelwall, and repairing the Roman fortifications of Manchester, meanwhile allowing Aelfwynn to exercise nominal authority in her mother's place. But the arrangement lasted less than a twelvemonth. In the winter of 919 Edward deported his niece into Wessex, where she presumably ended her days in a convent. This masterful act may or may not have been welcome to the Mercians, but it swept away thelast vestige of their independence."

ANCESTRAL FILE

Ancestral File Ver 4.10 FLGQ-66 Ethelfleda Princess of ENGLAND Born Abt 869 Wessex England Mar Ethelred Duke of MERCIA (AFN:GXQD-R9) Died 12 Jun 918 St Peters Gloucestershire England, HESP Ethelfleda, EBMicro Aethelflaed.

--------------------

BOOKS

Kings and Queens of Great Britain, Genealogical Chart, Anne Taute and Romilly Squire, Taute, 1990: "Aethelflaed The Lady of Mercia,Mar Aethelred Ealdorman of Mercia, Died 918."

A History of the English Speaking People Winston S Churchill Vol I The Birth of Britain Dodd Mead & Co 1956 p128: "Edward's sister had been, as we have seen, married to Earl Ethelred of Mercia. Ethelred died in 911, and his widow, Ethelfleda, succeeded and supassed him. In those savage times the mergence of a woman ruler was enough to betoken her possession of extraordinary qualities. Edward the Elder, as he was afterwards called, and his sister, the Lady of the Mercians,' conducted the national war in common, and carried its success to heights which Alred never knew. The policy of the two kingdoms, thus knit by blood and need, marched in perfect harmony, and the next onslaught of Danes was met with confident alacrity and soon broken. The victors then set themselves deliberately to the complete conquest of the Danelaw and its Five Boroughs. This task occupied the next ten years, brother and sister advancing in concert upon their respective lines, and fortifying towns they took at every stage. In 918, when Edward stormed Tempsford, near Bedford, and King Guthrum was killed, the whole resistance of East Anglia collapsed, and all the Danish leaders submitted to Edward as their protector and lord. They were granted in return their estates and the right to live according to their Danish customs. At the same time the Lady of the Mercians' conquered Leicester, and received even from York offers ofsubmission. In this hour of success Ethelfleda died, and Edward, hastening to Tamworth, was invited by the nobles of Mercia to occupy the vacant throne."

Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1981, Micropaedia, Vol III, p799, Edward the Elder: "[Edward's]sister, the Mercian ruler Aethelflaed, constructed a complementary series of fortresses in the northwest Midlands. In 917 Edward and Aethelflaed launched a massive offensive, quickly overwhelming the entire Danish army of East Anglia. Upon Aethelflaed's death in June 918, Edward assumed control of Mercia..."

Vol I, p116, Aethelflaed: "also Ethelfleda, called Lady of the Mercians, Died 12 Jun 918 Tamworth (now in Staffordshire), Anglo-Saxon ruler of Mercia in England. The daughter of Alfred the Great,...Aethelflaed became the effective ruler of Mercia some years before the death (911) of her husband, Aethelred, Ealdorman of the Mercians...captured Derby occupied Leicester but died before the campaign was successfully completed. Edward then claimed his sister's kingdom and completed the subjugation of the Danes. Because Aethelflaed had extended her influence into Wales and Northumbria, Edward was able to assert his authority over these regions as well. Thus, almost all of England came under his control."

The New Columbia Encyclopedia, 1975, p175, Athelstan: "...As a youth he lived in the household of his aunt, Aethelflaed, Lady of the Mercians..."

From Alfred to Henry III 871-1272, Christopher Brooke, 1961, Norton Library History of England, p43: "...In 886 [Alfred] captured London, and put it in charge of his close ally, Ethelred, Ealdorman of the Mercians, who shortly after married Alfred's daughter, Aethelflaed..."

p50: "...Ethelred,Ealdorman of Mercia, died in 911, but co-operation did not cease with his death. His place was filled by his wife, Edward's sister, Aethelflaed, Lady of the Mercians', who continued her husband's work in close association with her brother until her own death in 918; from then on Wessex and Mercia were united..."

"...After the Ealdorman Ethelred's death in 911, Edward took over London and the south-east Midlands, leaving the rest of English Mercia to Aethelflaed. The building offortresses and the advance east and north went on steadily through the following years. In 914 Aethelflaed built a fortress at Eddisbury (Cheshire) and at Warwick; in 917 she captured Derby; in 918 Leicester, and but for her death that year she might have received the submission of York. In 912 Edward built a burh at Herford, and prepared for campaigns to east and north. In 914 and 915 he received the submission of Bedford and Northampton; in 916 he built a burh at Maldon in Essex;in 917 he and his followers defeated a great counteroffensive mounted by the Danes, and occupied Essex and East Anglia, restoring the burh at Colchester. In 918 he was at Stamford and Nottingham. These places had been two of the crucial Danishcentres of power south of the Humber; it is likely that a third, Lincoln, also submitted to Edward in thsi year. By these surrenders he became lord of the Danelaw up to the line of the Humber; by his sister's death he was lord of Mercia; and inthe same year the kings of several leading Welsh kingdoms accepted his overlordship.

"The offer by the Danes of York to submit to Aethelflaed- an offer not repeated to Edward after her death- was partly inspired by the progress of anotherViking power, this time of Norse origin and leadership..."

The Formation of England 550-1042, HPR Finberg, 1977, Paladin, p127: "...In 885 the Danes in East Anglia broke the peace. Alfred reacted strongly, and in the following year took London by storm. London had long been a Mercian town, and Alfred refrained from annexing it to his own kingdom. Ceolwulf II, the last English king of Mercia, being now presumably dead, the part of Mercia not under Danish rule was governed by an ealdorman named Ethelred. Alfred entrusted the government of London to him and gave him his daughter Aethelflaed in marriage. Thus far Mercian independence was respected, but Ethelred never assumed the kingly title, and was content to reign as Alfred's viceroy...

p145: "The possibility that [the Norwegian immigrants crossing from Ireland and settling in the north-west] might make common cause with the independent Danish forces in eastern England naturally alarmed the government of English Mercia. The ealsorman Ethelred, as loyal to King Edward as he had been to Edward's father, was now a sick man, and responsibility devolved upon his wife, Alfred's daughter Aethelflaed. In 907 she repaired the walls of Chester and placed a garrison there to control disaffection in Wirral..."

"In 911 Ethelred of Mercia died, and Aethelflaed acquiesced when Edward annexed London and Oxford to his own kingdom. The doughty princess, half Mercian by descent on her mother's side, was known as the Lady of the Mercians. For the rest of her life she collaborated loyally and effectively with her brother in a campaign to subdue the independent Danish armies in England.

"The key to their strategy was the extension of the system devised by Alfred, of building fortresses, boroughs', to protect English territory from Danish inroads and to serve as bases for operations against the enemy... Meanwhile Aethelflaed fortified Sceargeat, a place as yet unidentified, and Bridgenorth on the Severn, a favourite crossing place of Danish war-bands. In 913 she built fortresses at Tamworth to protect the Mercian border from attack by the Danes of Leicester, and at Stafford to bar entry into the valley of the Trent. Next year she repaired a prehistoric camp at Eddisbury from which a garrison could intercept raiders landing from the Mersey. She also fortified Warwick...In 915 Aethelflaed secured her frontier with mid-Wales by a fort at Chirbury and guarded the head of the Mersey with one at Runcorn. By 916 a line of fortresses from Essex to the Mersey, eleven of them built or repaired by Aethelflaed, sixteen by Edward, menaced the Danes, who hurled themselves against them in vain. The last known Danish king of East Anglia perished in battle. Within a year the army of Northampton surrendered, Huntingdon was occupied, the armies of Cambridge and East Anglia submitted to Edward, and Derby, the first of the five principal Danish boroughs, was taken by Aethelflaed. There remained Leicester, Nottingham, Stamford, and Lincoln. In 918 Edward advanced to Stamford and overawed the Danes there into submission, while Aethelflaed made her entry unopposed into Leicester. Before the end of the year Nottingham had surrendered and all England south of the Humber acknowledged Edward as its master.

"Throughout this masterly campaign, brilliantly conceived and prosecuted with unwavering determination, the Lady of the Mercians acted in perfect accord with her brother. Both of them displayed generalship of the highest order. By contrast, the lack of cohesion between the various Danish armies weakened their resistance to the victorious pair. But Aethelflaed did not live to see the final triumph. She died on 12 June 918, leaving one child, a daughter Aelfwynn. To forestall any separatist tendency, Edward promptly occupied Tamworth, received the submission of the Mercians, and took command of their levies. Then he completed Aethelflaed's defences of her northern frontier by building a new fortress at Thelwall, and repairing the Roman fortifications of Manchester, meanwhile allowing Aelfwynn to exercise nominal authority in her mother's place. But the arrangement lasted less than a twelvemonth. In the winter of 919 Edward deported his niece into Wessex, where she presumably ended her days in a convent. This masterful act may or may not have been welcome to the Mercians, but it swept away thelast vestige of their independence."

--------------------

 
od England, Ælfthryth (I7636)
 
166 A rebel, was executed with his brother Johan and others, for revolt against Magnus Ladul Aspenäs, Birger Filipsson (I6424)
 
167 A squire is mentioned as a resident of Nasby (RHKn.) 1491-07-10. Was 1495 and 1499 Master of Laws in H Körning, Simon Ragvaldsson V (I6589)
 
168 A tall and handsome youth with light flaxen hair. Basilius Athelstan ( Æþelstan) King of the English (I14416)
 
169 A[nn]o 1607 de 17 Aprilis / sterf d eersam[e] Taecke Taeckes zo[on] ovt 59 iaer / Atse Intses (I42934)
 
170 A[nn]o 1619 de 20 Septemb[e]r/ sterf d. eerbare Tryntie kempe do[chte]r. olt 59 iaer Trijntje Keimpes (I42935)
 
171 A° 1625, DEN 12 SEPTEMB., STARF VROU ETKE ENGELKEN VAN FRIESCHELOO, HUISVROU VAN EPPE HUNINGA, VERWACHTEND EEN SALIGE OPSTANDING IN CHRISTO Engelken, Etta Johans (I18094)
 
172 A° 1627, DEN 24 FEBR., STERF DE EDELE MANHAFTE JONCKER DOEDE HUNINGA VAN OOSTWOLT, CAPITEIN DES NASSAUSCHEN REGIMENTS Huninga, Jonker Doedo Heer van Engelum en Jellema, Capitein des Nassauschen regiments (I18097)
 
173 A° 1641, DEN 16 SEPTEMB., STERF DE EDELE EERF. WYSE VERSIENIGE HEER AILCO HUNINGA VAN OOSTWOLT, AMBTMAN IN DEN CLEY OLDEN AMBTE, VERWACHTENDE EEN ZAL. OPEERSTANDINGE IN CHRISTO JESU Huninga, Aylcko Eppens Kerkvoogd van Woldendorp (I18095)
 
174 Aaltje van der Tuin gaat een verhouding aan met IJje Wijkstra (geboren Doezum, 4 juli 1895). Zij gaat zonder haar kinderen bij hem inwonen. Hendrik zat op dat moment in de gevangenis wegens diefstal. Vier veldwachters hadden de opdracht Aaltje op te halen en haar voor het gerecht te doen verschijnen omdat zij haar kinderen onverzorgd had achtergelaten. IJje Wijkstra schoot op 18 januari 1929 de vier politieagenten, bij zijn huis te Lukaswolde, dood. Uiteindelijk belandde hij in de gevangenis. Hij stierf te Eindhoven, 6 juni 1941. Aaltje werd naar Amsterdam gebracht en kwam daar in een gesticht. Zij verliet deze op 26 mei 1932 en ging in de Elandsstraat 186 wonen (hoofdbewoner Wimmers). Daar kreeg zij op 10 januari 1933 een dochter, Antje Wobbes. Zij verhuisden op 30 oktober 1933 naar de Van Reigersbergenstraat 81 (tevens hoofdbewoner Wimmers). Wobbes, Hendrik (I47316)
 
175 Tenminste nog één levende persoon is verbonden aan deze aantekening - detailgegevens worden niet weergegeven. de Groot, W.H. (I56761)
 
176 Aangegeven door de vroedvrouw wegens afwezigheid van de vader Nijman, Hermannus Jozephus (I10787)
 
177 Aangegeven door Hendrik Annes Voolstra Akkerman, Mettje Jeens (I53344)
 
178 Aangegeven door Wytze Jacobs Veenstra daar de vader niet kon door ziekte. van der Meer, Hendrik Sytzes (I51172)
 
179 Tenminste nog één levende persoon is verbonden aan deze aantekening - detailgegevens worden niet weergegeven. Schievink, E. (I49702)
 
180 Aangever erkent de vader te zijn van der Meer, Klaas Taekes (I21744)
 
181 Aanleunwoning van 't Suijderhuis Pijpker, Eeuwe (I55722)
 
182 Aanname... Aafke Pyters (I271)
 
183 Abbess of the convent of St. Clare's Priory, Stockholm. av Sverige, Richeza Magnusdotter abbess of the St. Clare's Priory, Stockholm (I6747)
 
184 Abedissa 1364-1366 Fr, Birgitta Finnvidsdotter (I7833)
 
185 Abel of Denmark (1218 ? 29 June 1252) was Duke of Schleswig from 1232 to 1252 and King of Denmark from 1250 until his death in 1252. He was the son of Valdemar II by his second wife, Bereng Estrids, Abel Valdemars Herzog von Schleswig, Konge af Danmark (I7805)
 
186 About Abraham Hansson

http://digi.narc.fi/digi/view.ka?kuid=5762812 -- Kyrksl 
Abraham Hansson (I5766)
 
187 About Abraham Jakobsson

http://www.sukuhistoria.fi/sshy/kirjat/Kirkonkirjat/karjalohja/rippikirja_1768-1779_tk688-689/70.htm
 
Abraham Jakobsson (I6007)
 
188 About Adolfina Wilhelmina L L, Adolfina Wilhelmina (I5838)
 
189 About Amalia Charlotta Nordstr MÃ¥sbäck, Amalia Charlotta (I5949)
 
190 About Amanda Sofia Blomqvist (L L, Amanda Sofia (I5837)
 
191 About Anders Johansson

Fr 
Anders Johansson (I5690)
 
192 About Anders Munck of Fulkila

Jully Ramsayn "on noble clans in Finland next to the Great Wrath". Sivuilla 285-286 esitell 
Munck af Fulkila, Anders (I6699)
 
193 About Anna Elisabet Andersdotter

f: http://hiski.genealogia.fi/hiski/46tw1p?fi+0205+kastetut+3874
http://www.sukuhistoria.fi/sshy/kirjat/Kirkonkirjat/kirkkonummi/rippikirja_1801-1806_es198/342.htm
g2: http://hiski.genealogia.fi/hiski/46tqaa?fi+0205+vihityt+1501
http://www.sukuhistoria.fi/sshy/kirjat/Kirkonkirjat/kirkkonummi/rippikirja_1807-1812_es198-199/191.htm
http://www.sukuhistoria.fi/sshy/kirjat/Kirkonkirjat/kirkkonummi/rippikirja_1835-1841_es200-201/38.htm
http://www.sukuhistoria.fi/sshy/kirjat/Kirkonkirjat/kirkkonummi/rippikirja_1842-1848_es201-202/38.htm
d: http://hiski.genealogia.fi/hiski/46s2d9?fi+0205+haudatut+11836

 
Anna Elisabet Andersdotter (I5684)
 
194 About Anna Lovisa L L, Anna Lovisa (I5818)
 
195 About Anna Margareta Eriksdotter Fast

http://digi.narc.fi/digi/view.ka?kuid=5766432 --  
Anna Margareta Eriksdotter (I5769)
 
196 About Astrid Olofsdotter, Sweden

http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrid_Olofsdotter_av_Sverige

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrid_Olofsdotter

http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrid_Olofsdatter

Astrid Olofsdotter, or possibly Estrid Olofsdotter, (date of birth unknown, d. 1035) was a Norwegian mediavel queen, queen consort of King Olaf II of Norway.

---

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Astrid Olof Daughter (? - 1035) was Queen of Norway until 1030 when Olaf the Thick was killed in the Battle of Stiklestad. Astrid was the daughter of the Swedish king Olof Sk 
Astrid Olofsdotter Prinsesse av Sverige (I7403)
 
197 About Axel Eriksson Lindholm

http://www.sukuhistoria.fi/sshy/kirjat/Kirkonkirjat/tenhola/rippikirja_1753-1759_mko21-26/54.htm
http://www.sukuhistoria.fi/sshy/kirjat/Kirkonkirjat/tenhola/rippikirja_1767-1773_mko33-38/59.htm

 
Lindholm, Axel Eriksson (I6052)
 
198 About Bengt Magnusson Leo III (Bengtsson (Folkunga family)), Folkunga dynasty Judge branch

http://www.adelsvapen.com/genealogi/Folkunga%C3%A4tten#TAB_12

http://genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00280493&tree=LEO

Bengt Magnusson (Folkunga dynasty Judge branch)

Magnus Bengtsson and his son Bengt Magnusson brought this variant of Folkunga family weapons Bengt Magnusson, great man, and the Privy Council, Judge of  
Folkunga, Bengt Magnusson Riksråd (I6526)
 
199 About Bertil Mattsson Gr Gr, Bertil Mattsson (I6123)
 
200 About Brita Larsdotter Creutz, i Sarvlax

http://www.adelsvapen.com/genealogi/Creutz_nr_92

http://runeberg.org/frfinl/0079.html

The old nobility. King Erik XIV renewed the nobility v. 1569. Introduced to the Swedish House of Nobility years. 1,625 number 96 for both the family surviving male members were given a free lord of the value 06/05/1654 and was introduced to number 48 Creutz vapaaherrallinen family still lives in Sweden, and one branch of the family still lives in the Netherlands. Councillor, Baron Johan Creutz, who was 12/31/1719 Count's title, descended from the still living family of the count Creutz, which was introduced in Sweden and number 68 at Finnish House of Nobility years. 1,818 the number 1.

Medieval families Creutz, Poitz and sciences, who lived in the same parish, and were closely related, probably Poitz and Creutz father's side of the same strain lineages, seem to have inherited from each other aateliskirjat and symbols.

Peringsk 
Creutz, Lars Mattsson (I6285)
 

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